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Author Topic: Down rigging  (Read 913 times)

Dirt23

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Down rigging
« on: Jun 10, 2022, 05:41 AM »
Finally ready to get boat on water and wanted to hear how others run there riggers.  I normally run about 50 to 75 behind the ball and have been told 2 things that's to much or to little opinion? Also have some old cannon realeases looking to upgrade suggestions?  Is any one running cheaters?  I'm gonna keep playing with different things because they can be an effective tool.  Last year dipseys produced 10 to 1 compared to riggers and both are normally set around whatever depth I'm marking fish at with same basic dead smelt rig why? I'm not looking for your trolling program just some hints to help down rigging thanks and keep it wet

Hottuna5150

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Re: Down rigging
« Reply #1 on: Jun 10, 2022, 08:01 AM »
First off I知 no expert, but I do alright. Personally I知 a chamberlain release guy but I know that blacks releases also have a big following and there are advantages to both. That said, I知 a tinkerer so the more adjustable a thing is, generally, the better. As far as distance behind the ball it depends on what I知 up to. If it痴 early and I知 salmon fishing I have a long line 75feet or so behind the ball. If I知 laker fishing later on and have flashers on the cable I may only have 8-10 feet out. Early on I found the 100 foot rule helpful in that if your cable is bare you let out 100 feet of line total. So if your down 25 feet you let out 75 feet behind the ball if you池e 85 feet down only 15 behind the ball.
All that said, there are some real experts on this site that can probably offer you a even more dialed in approach.

Jethro

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Re: Down rigging
« Reply #2 on: Jun 10, 2022, 09:40 AM »
I almost always set up my riggers the same way, at least when I am fishing flatfish on them. Like Hottuna I am a Chamberlain release guy. They make sense to me and allow me to preload the rod a bunch which I like. So I have 10lb cannonballs, I have a Scotty snubber on top of the ball, then I have my Chamberlain release on top of that. So the release is a good 14" above the top of the ball which sometimes saves my spoons when I get frustrated and start bouncing bottom on purpose. I run big flashers directly on the ball almost always, they are about 4 or 5 feet long. I'll usually let out 10 to 12 feet of line, then attach to my release. The result is a spoon that is 5 to 7 feet past and 14" above the last flasher blade. Almost never do I let more than 20 feet out past the ball, mostly because I like to do tight turns and figure eights and what not.

Dirt23

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Re: Down rigging
« Reply #3 on: Jun 13, 2022, 05:29 AM »
Good food for thought thank you guys

Mac Attack

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Re: Down rigging
« Reply #4 on: Jun 13, 2022, 08:30 AM »
Three things typically determine bait distance behind the ball when downrigging.
The fish, depth of the ball, and the water clarity.
Wary fish, such as walleye and "some" trout, are scared off by the boat, so longer leads will help.
Similarly, if the ball is only a short distance behind the baot, we lengthen the leads also.
Below 50' we typically tighten leads up, and it really helps turning as Geoff stated.
Clear waters allow fish to see to see further, and the boat, so lengthening the leads works here too.

BTW, it's not only seeing the boat, but hearing it too that will scare away the fish (or attract them as happens often with coho).

I like Chamberlains and Blacks, but rubber bands are simple and also very effective when pinning your stacker where you want it.

 



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