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Author Topic: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%  (Read 585 times)

CF

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Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« on: Jun 08, 2022, 04:33 AM »
"The Gulf of Maine is growing increasingly warm and salty, due to ocean currents pushing warm water into the gulf from the Northwest Atlantic, according to a new NASA-funded study. These temperature and salinity changes have led to a substantial decrease in the productivity of phytoplankton that serve as the basis of the marine food web. Specifically, phytoplankton are about 65% less productive in the Gulf of Maine than they were two decades ago, scientists at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in East Boothbay, Maine, report in new results published today. "



  https://www.nasa.gov/feature/esnt/2022/nasa-funded-study-gulf-of-maine-phytoplankton-productivity-down
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CF

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #1 on: Jun 08, 2022, 04:39 AM »
The point , though, is small fish, juvenile stages of lobster and shrimp have and will have less to eat and so we will see further declines in fisheries across the Gulf of Maine. So, less food will mean less lobster, fish and a decline in opportunity to catch them. Climate Change served cold with warm water!!!
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taxid

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #2 on: Jun 08, 2022, 08:21 AM »
Wow 65 percent less productive! That's a lot!
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

Jim C.

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #3 on: Jun 08, 2022, 09:49 AM »
No wonder the mackerel fishing has been slower in recent years.

woodchip1

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #4 on: Jun 08, 2022, 12:12 PM »
Is this because too much Phosphorus is running into Ocean??

taxid

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #5 on: Jun 08, 2022, 01:16 PM »
Is this because too much Phosphorus is running into Ocean??

Normally more phosphorus stimulates phytoplankton so that would not be the cause. Could be the species that prefers colder water is not as prevalent due to warmer water.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

CF

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #6 on: Jun 08, 2022, 04:15 PM »
Normally more phosphorus stimulates phytoplankton so that would not be the cause. Could be the species that prefers colder water is not as prevalent due to warmer water.
Yeah, That was a thought I'm wondering.. Is it possible other phytoplankton species will fill the niche fast enough?? Then! THAT question brings the next flood of questions. What Species? What are the next levels of consumers? Doesn't indicate good things for traditional fisheries species. i
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CF

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #7 on: Jun 09, 2022, 04:24 AM »
DATA REVEALS 20-YEAR TRANSFORMATION OF GULF OF MAINE June 7, 2022, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
    Two decades of research show a startling transformation of the Gulf of Maine. Many trends point to an overarching pattern: more warm, North Atlantic water is coming in and changing the foundation of the Gulf's food web.
A NEW SYNTHESIS:OF DATA has elucidated the startling transformation of the warming Gulf of Maine. Gathered and analyzed by researchers at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, the study shows many trends that all point to an overarching pattern. The Gulf of Maine is being increasingly influenced by warm water from the North Atlantic, and this is changing the very foundation of its food web.
"We've seen that the growth rate of phytoplankton is about a third of what it was 20 years ago; that's a really big deal," said Senior Research Scientist William Balch, lead author on the NASA-funded study. "These microscopic plants are the base of the food web on which all ocean life depends, and the change is connected to patterns and processes well beyond the Gulf of Maine."
Published by six authors from Bigelow Laboratory and two from Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, the team's findings tell a complex, interconnected story of transformative change.
3 DEGREES INCREASE IN 20 YEARS: The data show that the Gulf of Maine is rapidly warming overall. At the average depth of the Gulf, around 500 feet, mean temperatures have increased almost three degrees Fahrenheit over the last 20 years. Shallow waters have warmed slightly less during that time, and, surprisingly, have cooled in the spring months. Balch's new study is the first to show it.
"We all work with this mantra that the Gulf of Maine is one of the fastest warming bodies of water on the planet," Balch said. "Well, there's an asterisk next to that now, which is really important to understanding the complex changes we're seeing."
PARADOXICALLY COOLING TAKES PLACE BELOW 160 FT DEPTH and only during the spring season, which suggests an increasing amount of cold surface water is coming into the Gulf of Maine from cooler regions to the north, outside the Gulf.
Despite this limited and seasonal exception, the Gulf is still warming significantly overall, which is driving its transformation. Balch and his team used the long-term data from the Gulf of Maine North Atlantic Time Series to determine that warm, salty water from the North Atlantic has been intruding into deeper parts of the Gulf since 2008. This has raised both the temperature and salinity -- with significant impacts.
WARMING WATERS FUNDAMENTALLY ALTER THE PLANET: "It's not like the Gulf of Maine is an isolated pond and all the warming happening here is only happening in place," Balch said. "Rising temperatures are in large part due to this large influx of North Atlantic water, which itself is getting warmer. These changes take time, and they are fundamentally altering the planet."
MEASUREMENTS TAKEN TEN TIMES EACH YEAR: Balch and other scientists from Bigelow Laboratory started the Gulf of Maine North Atlantic Time series in 1998 to collect data at sea in order to validate NASA satellite information and observe any long-term environmental changes. The team takes the same measurements at the same geographic points about 10 times a year. This has provided a wealth of information on the physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the region -- and the dramatic changes they have gone through.
WHAT WILL HAPPEN DUE TO LONG TERM WARMING IN THE GULF OF MAINE? "We're able to illuminate important interconnections because we have a big enough dataset," Balch said. "It allowed us to take a holistic look at this important region and determine what the warming means for Gulf of Maine processes and the life that depends on them."
Despite the alarming trends, Balch remains hopeful for the Gulf of Maine. Organisms are finding new habitats, filling niches, and adapting. Things may never be what they once were, but the planet could heal if our society gives it the chance.
Materials provided by Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.
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taxid

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #8 on: Jun 09, 2022, 09:16 AM »
What I find intriguing is if enough sea ice permanently melts it could change the course of the Gulf Stream due to heavier sinking fresher colder water interacting to move the warmer Gulf Stream. This could be earth shattering not only to fisheries that will relocate, but regional climates. I.e. one example of the potential relocation of water temps effecting climate, is Northern Germany, that is at the same latitude as southern Alaska -- will not only not have the moderating effect of the sea and would go into a deep freeze similar to Alaskas's climate. More locally I wonder if a movement away from the New England coast of the Gulf Strean could have a negative effect on precip in New England. An extended drought could be a disaster with all the old growth forest.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

CF

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #9 on: Jun 10, 2022, 05:20 AM »
What I find intriguing is if enough sea ice permanently melts it could change the course of the Gulf Stream due to heavier sinking fresher colder water interacting to move the warmer Gulf Stream.
This is a iikely scenario if the ice sheets and glaciers collapse.
"This means that the current as we know it could weaken until it reaches a tipping point, flipping from the stronger state to the weaker one. This will rapidly transform climates across the Northern Hemisphere to be much less temperate than they are right now."

https://www.livescience.com/gulf-stream-close-to-collapse
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buddah

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #10 on: Jun 11, 2022, 11:16 PM »
Still up to your same old scare tactics I see.Alewive runs the strongest they've ever been.Bluefin tuna catch rate so strong that we can only keep one a day and only fish4 days a week because we'll flood the market.Mackerel so thick you can't get a herring fly down through them to get herring.People getting limits of haddock in less time than it takes to to the fishing grounds.Do you even fish,or just regurgitate crap that you hear on the "news"?.

CF

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #11 on: Jun 12, 2022, 07:10 AM »
Still up to your same old scare tactics I see.Alewive runs the strongest they've ever been.Bluefin tuna catch rate so strong that we can only keep one a day and only fish4 days a week because we'll flood the market.Mackerel so thick you can't get a herring fly down through them to get herring.People getting limits of haddock in less time than it takes to to the fishing grounds.Do you even fish,or just regurgitate crap that you hear on the "news"?.
Interesting, if not particularly strong of mind. I suppose you help in case studies like that . I post a scientific report. NO opinion placed, just a study done over decades. I suppose I had been waiting, latently, for the dumbazz chorus to chime in. Sorry to make you all twitchy, NOT! hehe
 "Agnorant
ag-ner-uhnt , noun
1. people who are ignorant and arrogant simultaneously:
Example: Agnorant people believe they know more about science than scientists.
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canoeist

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #12 on: Jun 12, 2022, 08:54 AM »
But cold water loving Maine shrimp is doing good…right?! Because I saw lots of shrimp in the grocery store so everything is perfect…right????  :o

PK186

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Re: Gulf of Maine Phytoplankton Down 65%
« Reply #13 on: Jun 12, 2022, 10:24 AM »
Interesting, if not particularly strong of mind. I suppose you help in case studies like that . I post a scientific report. NO opinion placed, just a study done over decades. I suppose I had been waiting, latently, for the dumbazz chorus to chime in. Sorry to make you all twitchy, NOT! hehe
 "Agnorant
ag-ner-uhnt , noun
1. people who are ignorant and arrogant simultaneously:
Example: Agnorant people believe they know more about science than scientists.


That's being childish and rude. FJP

 



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