FishUSA.com Fishing Tackle

Author Topic: trolling up stripers  (Read 610 times)

rivereddy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 453
trolling up stripers
« on: Jul 09, 2021, 01:39 PM »
The weather in central Indiana has just been strange lately.  5 days of downpour rains and yet the garden is still dry and the river is low.  I had
planned on making a run yesterday but we had thunder and sprinkles off and on all day.  It was hot and humid.  I bagged the boat, went over
to the river, caught a few dinks and called it a day. This morning it was 20 degrees cooler with patchy clouds.  The forecast said 5-7 mph from the NW.  Well, the passing cold front had other ideas and the lake greeted my with 10-15 mph north winds and whitecaps everywhere.  This forced me to change plans.  Instead of looking for "jumps" we trolled bomber spinner rigs like I described the other day.  Again our first hit came within the first 5 minutes.  My buddy tossed a marker over the side of the boat to mark the spot. It was plastic - and promptly sank! We did zero in on a hump and worked it over pretty good taking good sized stripers with every run.  Lots of doubles and heavy hits.  Sizes were mixed.  We caught a few dinks and he occasional crappie but the adult stripers/white bass were 14-15 " long, between one and two pounds.  Great day.

fish on,

rivereddy

taxid

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5,936
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #1 on: Jul 09, 2021, 11:09 PM »
You mean wipers?
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

rivereddy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 453
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #2 on: Jul 10, 2021, 06:35 AM »
These were "silvers" aka whites or sand bass - Marone chrysops.  I may be wrong, but i don't think
this resi gets hybrid or wiper stockings any more.  I'll poke around a bit and report back,

fish on,

rivereddy

taxid

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5,936
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #3 on: Jul 10, 2021, 07:37 AM »
O.K. then they are not wipers or stripers. They are white bass.  ;)
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

fishogger

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,212
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #4 on: Jul 10, 2021, 05:33 PM »
arent those huge white bass?  i dont have any around me so i dont know.  only ones eve caught were on the tippy reservoirs.  they werent that big. lol
some fishermen tell lies,  this one doesnt need to

rivereddy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 453
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #5 on: Jul 10, 2021, 08:07 PM »
State record is 4lbs, 3 oz caught in 1965.  The big ones we caught were probably 2 # and less.
One of the concerns about stocking wipers or hybrids is that they have shown at least a small
degree of interfertility with white bass.  This presents itself as a rather slippery slope.  Larger
size potential must be weighed against possible loss of tolerance to high water temps.  The
record fish was caught in 1965, long before the state was stocking hybrids.

fish on,

rivereddy

LundProv

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 132
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #6 on: Jul 10, 2021, 10:39 PM »
Ok, this is kind of embarrassing, as I have fished for a lot of years.  Most every time I fish Koonce Lake in Marshall County, I go out to the deep area and use a blue/silver jigging rapala and fan cast for the fun of catching these very aggressive, very strong, not terribly large white bass looking fish with black horizontal lines.  At times, I can catch a lot of them and they are extremely good fighters.  I have never kept any and have talked to other fisherman on the lake that tell me they are good to eat if you fillet out a mud vein or something.  When it comes to eats, I will stick with my panfish and walleyes.  So, what type of fish is this?  Is this the same species you are referencing in this post?  Thanks for the information...

fishogger

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,212
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #7 on: Jul 11, 2021, 08:38 AM »
they should eat just as good as other panfish.  they just have a larger lateral line aka mud vein.  any fish with dark meat as the lateral line or under skin should be trimmed.  it will improve the taste of the fillet.  it also removes some of the toxins stored in the fish.  especially from rivers or great lakes caught fish.  :sick:

id say your catching white bass in koontz lake.  a buddy goes to tippy lake and catches them. 
some fishermen tell lies,  this one doesnt need to

rivereddy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 453
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #8 on: Jul 11, 2021, 10:18 AM »
Backing up fishhoggers suggestion.  The "mudvein" in fish is actually a differnt type of tissue that is rich in a blood protein called myoglogin.
it helps fish process food and oxygen to produce energy. (It's what makes dark meat in a chicken different from white meat)  It also has a
stronger taste that many describe as "gamey".  Removing it from the fillet leaves only the white meat which usually has a milder taste.
No fish tastes its best if the catch is not handled correctly. White bass, prepared correctly produces some mighty fine eating, but it takes a little preplanning. With few exceptions, after a certain size is reached, most fish take on a stronger taste.  My personal choice for white bass is between 10" -12 inches. The big ones go back into the water.  If I am going to keep some for the table I do the following:

     1  Since I have no live well, I put them on ice in a cooler immediately after capture.
     2  As soon as it is convenient, I bleed them by cutting a couple of gill arches
     3  Fillet the fish in whatever style one chooses then, with a couple of slanting cuts
         remove the dark tissue that is found on the outer side of the fillet (mudvein)
     4  Have a fish fry!
     ** random note here.... though much smaller, yellow bass taste great as well.

Again, with appologies for letting the biologist loose,

fish on,

rivereddy

Spooled85

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 545
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #9 on: Jul 11, 2021, 11:59 AM »
Im down at Brookville lake , been here since Thursday the wypers have been on fire down here ! Almost getting sick of catching them . I kept a bag of some nice ones last night , the wife loves them . I cat all red meet off them saute them in a skillet with butter garlic and lemon pepper . They are pretty good that way

taxid

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5,936
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #10 on: Jul 12, 2021, 07:56 AM »
they should eat just as good as other panfish.  they just have a larger lateral line aka mud vein.  any fish with dark meat as the lateral line or under skin should be trimmed.  it will improve the taste of the fillet.  it also removes some of the toxins stored in the fish.  especially from rivers or great lakes caught fish.  :sick:

id say your catching white bass in koontz lake.  a buddy goes to tippy lake and catches them.

Yes I was just going to say Tippy has some large ones.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

taxid

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5,936
Re: trolling up stripers
« Reply #11 on: Jul 12, 2021, 07:58 AM »
Backing up fishhoggers suggestion.  The "mudvein" in fish is actually a differnt type of tissue that is rich in a blood protein called myoglogin.
it helps fish process food and oxygen to produce energy. (It's what makes dark meat in a chicken different from white meat)  It also has a
stronger taste that many describe as "gamey".  Removing it from the fillet leaves only the white meat which usually has a milder taste.
No fish tastes its best if the catch is not handled correctly. White bass, prepared correctly produces some mighty fine eating, but it takes a little preplanning. With few exceptions, after a certain size is reached, most fish take on a stronger taste.  My personal choice for white bass is between 10" -12 inches. The big ones go back into the water.  If I am going to keep some for the table I do the following:

     1  Since I have no live well, I put them on ice in a cooler immediately after capture.
     2  As soon as it is convenient, I bleed them by cutting a couple of gill arches
     3  Fillet the fish in whatever style one chooses then, with a couple of slanting cuts
         remove the dark tissue that is found on the outer side of the fillet (mudvein)
     4  Have a fish fry!
     ** random note here.... though much smaller, yellow bass taste great as well.

Again, with appologies for letting the biologist loose,

fish on,

rivereddy

From what I understand the "different type of tissue" is a muscle used for quick bursts of speed.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

 



Iceshanty | MyFishFinder | MyHuntingForum
Contact | Disclaimer | Sponsor
© 2004- MyFishFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.