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Author Topic: Wild edibles  (Read 904 times)

Timmydann

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Wild edibles
« on: Apr 28, 2021, 03:35 PM »
Went to the lake today to see if I could get some crappie, had no luck with that but I did get a few gills, on my way home I noticed a patch of wild green onions, as i was harvesting them i noticed some ferns growing on the other side of the trail, to my delight they were fiddleheads, I'm thinking liver and bacon with the onions and sauted fiddleheads for dinner tomorrow

Timmydann

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #1 on: Apr 28, 2021, 03:42 PM »
Maybe tomorrow I'll go look for some marsh marigold ;)

MILLERMANKT

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #2 on: Apr 28, 2021, 08:42 PM »
What is marsh marigold ? I'm hoping to go look for ramps next week

claymore6

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Timmydann

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #4 on: Apr 28, 2021, 09:27 PM »
Marsh  marigold is the first green you're going to see in marshy areas , will have cluster of yellow flowers soon, taste like spinach, get it now before the flowers bloom

claymore6

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #5 on: Apr 28, 2021, 09:31 PM »
Forgot to mention it is dangerous and toxic:
Herb: Marsh Marigold
Latin name: Caltha palustris
Family: Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)

Medicinal use of Marsh Marigold: Every part of this plant is strongly irritant and so it should be used with caution. The whole plant is anodyne, antispasmodic, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant and rubefacient. It has been used to remove warts and is also used in the treatment of fits and anaemia. The root is antirheumatic, diaphoretic, emetic and expectorant. A decoction is used in the treatment of colds. A poultice of the boiled and mashed roots has been applied to sores. A tea made from the leaves is diuretic and laxative. All parts of the plant can irritate or blister the skin or mucous membranes.

Description of the plant:

Plant:
Perennial


Height:
30 cm
(11 3/4 inch)
Flowering:
March
to July
Habitat of the herb: Wet areas in marshes, fens, ditches and wet alder woods. Rare on very base poor peat.

Edible parts of Marsh Marigold: Root - must be well cooked. The raw root should not be eaten. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity. Flower buds - raw, cooked or pickled and used as a caper substitute. Eating the raw flower buds can lead to intoxication. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity. Young leaves - raw or cooked. The leaves are harvested in the spring as the plant is coming into flower and is used like spinach after cooking in two or more changes of water. Eating the raw leaves can lead to intoxication. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity. Older leaves, before the plant flowers, can be eaten if they are well cooked. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

Other uses of the herb: A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers, a saffron substitute. It is used as a dye when mixed with alum, though it is not very permanent. Plants can be grown for ground cover when planted about 45cm apart each way.

Propagation of Marsh Marigold: Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame in late summer. Stand the pots in 2 - 3cm of water to keep the soil wet. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 3 months at 15�C. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a tray of water in a cold frame until they are at least 15cm tall. Plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in early spring or autumn. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer or following spring.

Cultivation of the herb: Wet areas in marshes, fens, ditches and wet alder woods. Rare on very base poor peat.

Known hazards of Caltha palustris: The whole plant, but especially the older portions, contains the toxic glycoside protoanemonin - this is destroyed by heat. The sap can irritate sensitive skin.

Timmydann

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #6 on: Apr 28, 2021, 09:45 PM »
Okay, show a picture, the plant im talking about ive eaton my whole life, my parents called them cow slips

Timmydann

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #7 on: Apr 28, 2021, 10:02 PM »
B. T. W.  Boil with backing soda first, and change the water often, they're muddy

Perch-Pirate

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #8 on: Apr 29, 2021, 06:17 AM »
Sounds Delicious...🤮
I think Iíll stick with things that donít try to kill me..

rgfixit

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #9 on: Apr 29, 2021, 08:32 AM »
The spinach in my trough planter is delicious. Donít have to boil the snot out of it either. .....and......itís organic.

Rg
ď You better cut the pizza in four pieces because Iím not hungry enough to eat six.Ē

Yogi

fishogger

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Re: Wild edibles
« Reply #10 on: Apr 29, 2021, 09:23 AM »
dug almost a 5 gallon bucket of ramps so far.  they grow all over here.  asparagus shrooms ramps fish and wild turkey going down my neck this week.  mite toss some ramps in my turkey pot pie from the dark meat. fun getting groceries isnt it! lol

i never heard of eating cows lip before.  ill do some reading

was a family around here that picked and ate skunk cabbage.  think ill leave that to them. :sick:
some fishermen tell lies,  this one doesnt need to

https://xyz.frankspeech.com/  one america news-still a free press

 



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