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Author Topic: Death of a small pond  (Read 1346 times)

grubdropper

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Death of a small pond
« on: Dec 23, 2021, 11:13 AM »
Does anyone know what happened to chittning pond near Waterville ny on route 20.   There is no more water in it.   It’s all dried up.  It was a New York State fishing access location with a handicap deck.   

regulator

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #1 on: Dec 23, 2021, 12:25 PM »
Looks like Dam repairs and habitat improvement.

https://www.dec.ny.gov/press/122633.html

Raquettedacker

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #2 on: Dec 23, 2021, 12:36 PM »
Yes that’s what there doing..

That place has been dead the past 8 years.  It’s really to bad. 
 Maybe it does need a good douching and start over.. :-\
 Was always a fun place to catch some small crappies.  Did have some nice bass in it at one time..
 Use to see people who can’t read or follow the rules and keep everything they caught. Always reported it when I got cell reception but by that time it was to late.. 
  >:( >:(
 
Sometimes we live no particular way but our own.....<br />Strangers stopping strangers just to shake there hand...<br />\"Dying is the easy part. Learning how to live is the hard part....\"

regulator

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #3 on: Dec 23, 2021, 12:49 PM »
Never fished it, but always wanted to. Wonder how long it will take to get back to good fishing of any sort.

Rugburn

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #4 on: Dec 23, 2021, 03:50 PM »
I have a 1/2-acre pond behind my house that I built in 1997. Over time the cattails overwhelmed the place. Then the filamentous algae became another issue, although the fishing remained fantastic. Could always walk out and grab a fish dinner whenever you wanted. Had some of the biggest crappies I've ever seen, along with beauty LMB and cats. Well, I went out on a February afternoon to grab a meal and nothing. Dropped the camera down a few holes and nothing but dead fish. The next summer after the winter kill, I pumped the water out and excavated all the cattails and decaying vegetation. This time I made the pond walls steeper in hope of discouraging the cattails and added all sorts of neat structure. This was last summer (2020) when it was so dry. By this spring it was full again and ready for plan B. Next I added 30 dozen fathead minnows which successfully reproduced. Then I put an aeration bottom diffuser air pump system in. This fall after the minnows had the run of the place all summer, I added a dozen perch. I love to eat perch so figured I'd give them a try. If their population gets out of control, I'm going to try adding a few walleyes which probably won't reproduce. Seems like a long process but hopefully worth it, the pond looks great again! So, I agree sometimes these waters do need a helping hand, and it can take years to reestablish itself. Guess I've become a fish farmer!  ;)

grubdropper

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #5 on: Dec 28, 2021, 01:59 AM »
That pond had good fish in it when they drained it.       

trapper2000

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #6 on: Dec 28, 2021, 05:32 AM »
rugburn that sounds really  cool i would love to hear how it works out
you can destroy buildings  you can't  destroy the  american spirit

Mac Attack

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #7 on: Dec 28, 2021, 07:53 AM »
rugburn that sounds really  cool i would love to hear how it works out

Me too - please keep us updated on things.

Rugburn

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #8 on: Dec 28, 2021, 03:34 PM »
The pond proved its ability to produce big fish, but the low oxygen condition did it in during a long winter ice over. From what I've read during my research is that the oxygen pump can be a huge factor in fish growth rates. I have installed a Hiblow diaphragm pump, which reliably runs nice and quiet. I put it on a timer and run it during daylight hours in the winter and I'll switch to nighttime hours during the heat of the summer. The recent thread on the confusing proposed rule changes validates my efforts to be self-reliant.

taxid

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #9 on: Dec 29, 2021, 07:18 AM »
The pond proved its ability to produce big fish, but the low oxygen condition did it in during a long winter ice over. From what I've read during my research is that the oxygen pump can be a huge factor in fish growth rates. I have installed a Hiblow diaphragm pump, which reliably runs nice and quiet. I put it on a timer and run it during daylight hours in the winter and I'll switch to nighttime hours during the heat of the summer. The recent thread on the confusing proposed rule changes validates my efforts to be self-reliant.

I do the same for my ponds that have my fish in them. The hatchery ponds are empty during the winter so no need. Just a small open area in less than a third of your maximum depth in the winter is all you need. Be aware in some diaphragm pumps the diaphragm freezes up in winter. I have a one that does not, but had one I used previously that was disigned for septic tanks that froze up when the temps got below zero. However I thawed it out and it was fine.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

trapper2000

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #10 on: Dec 29, 2021, 07:25 AM »
i am ignorant of the  pump systems  but  arn't the  pumps  submersible?????
you can destroy buildings  you can't  destroy the  american spirit

Rugburn

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #11 on: Dec 29, 2021, 08:46 AM »
There are a few ways to do it Trapper. You can have a pump in the water which pushes water, like a dock bubbler or a fountain style. This does require an electric wire into the water, we can all see some of the problems this could bring. Plus pushing water uses more energy than pushing air. The system I use, no electric cables into the water. My power goes to a pump house located on the shoreline above high water mark. In the pump house is an air pump, hooked to weighted air line running down to a weighted diffuser located near the bottom. It's a super-sized aquarium pump. The air pumps come in many sizes and designs. The diaphragm pump I have does have a limitation of only being able to push air about 8' down, any deeper and you will stress the pump. Then you can jump up to a piston style pump which are much stronger, but also more noise, cost etc. Yes, Taxid I did buy my pump from Septic Solutions. Time will tell, no freeze ups yet but this my first winter.

taxid

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #12 on: Mar 21, 2022, 04:55 PM »
How did did your pump fair Rugburn? Did it run all winter?
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

Rugburn

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #13 on: Mar 22, 2022, 08:24 AM »
The pump ran fine all winter, but the timer failed in the subzero temps so I pulled it and just let the pump run. Can probably try the timer again now. Checked the shallows couple of days ago because we just had ice out, there were clouds of minnows swimming around. Didn't see any perch yet, but bet they grew some.

wile.e.1

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Re: Death of a small pond
« Reply #14 on: Mar 22, 2022, 08:40 AM »
for the last 10 yrs or so I have been using a product from fishpondaerators.com , I believe thy are out of Wisconsin  The pump is called  " big max large pond air diffusion aerator "  .  After the 1st winter at my place had all kinds of winter kill.  Lost a few really big Koi.  I now use this aerator all winter.  It runs off 110 , its quiet and is cheap to run,  the pump stays on land ( I built a wooden enclosure for it,  basically a box on short legs with a metal top ) then run 50-100' of hose connected to the big defuser on the end.  Toss it out , mine is in roughly in 10 fow and it keeps an area of about 20 - 40 'across open even in the nastiest of winters.   Since using I have had no dead loss,  another cool thing is the critters you see visit the open water,  all kinds of things stop by for a drink

 



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