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Author Topic: Bee and other stings  (Read 3912 times)

1tigger

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #15 on: Jun 27, 2006, 03:09 PM »
I also am one of the lucky Epi - Pin carriers .
I found out I was alergic when I tried to drink a honey bee .
I  USED TO drink my soda from a can but no longer do .
I am also a smoker and one day I had my usual coke and went to take a drink and found something in my mouth thinking it was a cigarette butt because thats where I would put them when my can was empty . Well I found different when I went to spit out what I thought was a butt and a honey bee latched on to my lip and let me have it .I looked like Mike Tyson popped me in the mouth for a couple of days after that  Needless to say I will only drink out of a bottle now .

grumpymoe

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #16 on: Jun 27, 2006, 07:06 PM »
thanks for the advice everyone....and yes...gonna start carrying precaution around now...got up this morning and headed to work....bejeebers...took a look in the mirror when I got there and I didnt recognize myself...my lips felt like I'd been to the dentist and from my eyebrows down its just one big puffy mess....its starting to subside now, and hopefully over the next day or two I'll get back to normal....what did it this morning was one of my techs who asked if I got into a brawl last night...lmao...that did it for me....packed up my stuff and headed back home before 8:00 am today...thanks again for all the stories and especially the great advice.....Grump

billditrite

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #17 on: Jun 27, 2006, 09:06 PM »
they dont sting like a screwdrivah do they?  ;D
Scotty 

winchester 88

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #18 on: Jun 27, 2006, 09:15 PM »
If any of you have had a reaction to a sting I urge you to as the brothers have related and get a kit to inject yourself in case that you are stung and have a reaction.
 A co-worker nearly lost his son to the allergic reaction of a bee sting and a neighbor who was standing in his yard talking to a friend and was stung by a wasp died within 20 minutes of the sting.
 This is nothing to mess with.
 
Winchester 88

Reel Wet Ride

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #19 on: Jun 28, 2006, 01:44 PM »
I agree with some of the others Grump, get a kit.  Can you imagine looking at yourself in the mirror if you had been stung by 20 of them instead of 1?  I was shooting my bow one day when my arrow passed thru and stuck the ground...no big deal....well it turns out it stuck a nest of ground hornets and when I went to pull my arrows from the target they swarmed. I took over 20 hits and spent the rest of the day in bed rotating ice packs. Lucky for me I'm not allergic, just a sissy when it comes to that shii.....But for those who are....Get the KIT!

Art 53

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #20 on: Jun 28, 2006, 05:43 PM »
Builditright  Are you talking about the screwdriver you tryed to sharpen your pencil with I love that one!!!!!

grumpymoe

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #21 on: Jun 28, 2006, 06:02 PM »
we both did our best to imitate a skewered human last year didnt we? lol....I'll take the sting and the swelling anyday to driving a screwdriver through 4 knuckles without going through any bone...bejeebers...you want to feel pain....cramps like you wouldnt believe....right bud....Grump ;D

Bartman44

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #22 on: Jun 28, 2006, 08:43 PM »
Grump,

Sorry about your episode but thanks for the post. My last sting (two years ago) set up an allergy as my hand swelled big time. I carry the kit now waiting for the next encounter (which, of course, will happen) It was nice hearing from all the other guys that use the kit as I haven't had to use it yet.
Thanks,
Bart

pot-belly-pike

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #23 on: Jun 29, 2006, 04:14 AM »
That reminds me  a few years ago now  I was working on a organic farm &  got slammed by black flys
man those suckers can bite   I had to go to er more than once  I had to get a rx for bennie

my eye swelled up  s o much & nose 

swelled up 2
Smile it makes others wonder what your up to

           ~:+)

oh no fish-on i gotta get fishin

billditrite

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #24 on: Jun 29, 2006, 04:54 AM »
Builditright  Are you talking about the screwdriver you tryed to sharpen your pencil with I love that one!!!!!

that would be the one ...LOL...some lessons shouldnt need to be learned the hard way but i guess i was a hard learner  ::) 
Scotty 

1tigger

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #25 on: Jun 29, 2006, 06:37 AM »
You also need a Medic Alert necklace or bracelet !!!
You never know if a sting could render you unconscious . At least this way a medic can treat you faster if you're unable to tell them what happend .

bwalleye

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Re: Bee and other stings
« Reply #26 on: Jun 30, 2006, 02:19 AM »
I copied this text from Mayo clinic. Thought it might be helpful.  It's quite a read, but not too bad if it saves a life. 

bwalleye

Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Common triggers include insect venoms, latex, foods and medications.

Your immune system produces antibodies that defend against foreign substances, including allergens. When antibodies attach to these foreign substances, they may release chemicals that can cause allergic symptoms such as watery eyes and a runny nose. Anaphylaxis occurs when your immune system severely overreacts to an allergen. The flood of chemicals released in your body during anaphylaxis makes your blood pressure drop suddenly, and your bronchial tubes narrow, causing difficulty breathing or even unconsciousness and death. You may have an anaphylactic response within seconds or minutes of exposure to an allergen such as the venom from a bee sting or an ingested peanut.

Although anaphylaxis is the most dangerous type of allergic reaction, it's also the least common. Still, hundreds of Americans die of anaphylactic shock each year.

Fortunately, you can be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to an allergy emergency by knowing the signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction and by carrying emergency medication with you. It's also important to do everything you can to prevent exposure to life-threatening allergens.


Signs and symptoms
An anaphylactic reaction is most likely to occur in susceptible people who have been stung by a bee or bitten by an insect, eaten food containing food allergens, or taken a new medication. The effects of anaphylaxis aren't limited to the site of the exposure. Development of the following signs and symptoms within minutes of exposure to an allergen is a strong indication of anaphylaxis:

Constriction of the airways, including wheezing and a swollen throat, that results in difficulty breathing
Shock associated with a severe decrease in blood pressure
Weak and rapid pulse
Dizziness or fainting
Hives and itching
Flushed or pale skin
Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
Anxiety

 Causes
Many allergens can cause anaphylaxis. Sometimes the cause of an anaphylactic reaction is unknown. The most common causes of anaphylaxis include:

Drugs, such as penicillin
Foods such as peanuts, tree nuts (walnuts, pecans), milk, eggs, fish and shellfish
Insect stings from bees, yellow jackets, wasps, hornets and fire ants
Latex

 Anaphylaxis isn't a common condition, though many people are at risk of having an anaphylactic reaction. If you have a history of allergies or asthma, you may be at increased risk especially if you've had prior anaphylactic reactions. Future reactions may be more severe than the first.

Treatment
Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the drug most commonly used to treat anaphylactic reactions. You can self-administer the drug with an autoinjector, such as the EpiPen or the EpiPen Jr. An autoinjector is a combined syringe and concealed needle that injects a single dose of medication when pressed against your thigh. Your doctor may recommend that you carry epinephrine with you. Be sure you know how to use the autoinjector properly. Also, make sure the people closest to you know how to administer the drug if they're with you in an anaphylactic emergency, they could save your life. Medical personnel called in response to a severe anaphylactic reaction also may give you epinephrine.

If necessary, a doctor or emergency medical team may perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). They may also administer intravenous antihistamines and cortisone to reduce inflammation of your air passages and improve your breathing.

If you're with someone who has experienced anaphylaxis and shows signs of shock pale, cool and clammy skin, weak and rapid pulse, shallow breathing, confusion, anxiety follow these steps:

Call 911 or emergency medical help immediately.
Check to see if the person is carrying special medications to treat an allergic attack. If so, administer the medication.
Get the person to lie down on his or her back and elevate the feet higher than the head to keep adequate blood flow to the brain, which will prevent fainting. Keep him or her from moving unnecessarily.
Keep the person warm and comfortable. Loosen tight clothing and cover him or her with a blanket. Don't give the person anything to drink.
If the person is vomiting or bleeding from the mouth, place the person on his or her side to prevent choking.
If the person isn't breathing or has no pulse, perform CPR.

Prevention
The best way to prevent anaphylaxis is to avoid substances that you know cause this severe reaction. Follow these steps to help ensure your well-being:

Wear a medical alert necklace or bracelet to indicate if you have an allergy to specific drugs or other substances.
Alert your doctor to your drug allergies before having any medical treatment. If you receive allergy shots, always wait at least 30 minutes before leaving the clinic so that you can receive immediate treatment if you have a severe reaction to the allergy shot.
Keep a properly stocked emergency kit with prescribed medications available at all times. Your doctor can advise you on the appropriate contents. This may include an epinephrine autoinjector. Make sure your autoinjector has not expired. These medications generally last 18 months.
If you're allergic to stinging insects, exercise caution when they're nearby. Wear long-sleeved shirts and trousers. Avoid bright colors and don't wear perfumes or colognes. Stay calm if you come in proximity to a stinging insect. Move away slowly and avoid slapping at the insect.
Avoid wearing sandals or walking barefoot in the grass if you're allergic to insect stings.
If you have specific food allergies, read the labels of all the foods you buy. Manufacturing processes can change, so it's important to periodically recheck the labels of foods you commonly eat. When eating out, ask about ingredients in the food, and ask about food preparation because even small amounts of the food you're allergic to can cause a serious reaction.




 



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