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Author Topic: Brown  (Read 551 times)

SLAYERFISH

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Brown
« on: Mar 24, 2018, 07:03 PM »
10.64lb on a Kastmaster.


fishnmachine

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Re: Brown
« Reply #1 on: Mar 24, 2018, 07:35 PM »
That's a beauty!   ;D
     One more with the one we're after and we'll have two.
The brook trout is the prom queen of the trout world, and a promiscuous prom queen at that!

filetandrelease

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Re: Brown
« Reply #2 on: Mar 24, 2018, 08:01 PM »

That’s a nice one 👍🏻

Raquettedacker

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Re: Brown
« Reply #3 on: Mar 25, 2018, 08:29 AM »
Way to slay them.....    :thumbup_smilie: :thumbup_smilie:
Sometimes we live no particular way but our own.....<br />Strangers stopping strangers just to shake there hand...<br />\"Dying is the easy part. Learning how to live is the hard part....\"

dirtydeeds

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Re: Brown
« Reply #4 on: Mar 25, 2018, 08:33 AM »
wow thats a brute!! nice work!
done dirt cheap!

taxid

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Re: Brown
« Reply #5 on: Mar 25, 2018, 09:35 AM »
Beautiful fish!

Too bad we can't manage a few of our Indiana lakes to produce fish that big and bigger like in the past. Just not a priority I guess.

Here's a former state record over 10 lbs. from a lake in my state just before the salmonid fisheries took off in the Great Lakes. One was found dead of natural causes at 13 pounds.

“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

oatkasut

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Re: Brown
« Reply #6 on: Mar 25, 2018, 02:25 PM »
What does that fish feed on to get so fat? Nice one!

taxid

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Re: Brown
« Reply #7 on: Mar 25, 2018, 02:50 PM »
What does that fish feed on to get so fat? Nice one!

I assume you are talking about he brown in the black and white photo?

The answer is some kind of coldwater forage base. They don't get that way on invertebrates or zooplankton. Back then it was smelt. The smelt are gone and the INDNR refuses to allow them to be re-introduced. Most likely the smelt and cisco were wiped out by lake trout plantings. Not uncommon in smaller lakes and reservoirs. Lake trout are voracious predators of coldwater forage fish.

That was Olin Lake btw. Also produced a state record smallmouth or close to it IIRR.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

filetandrelease

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Re: Brown
« Reply #8 on: Mar 25, 2018, 03:53 PM »

What is the reasoning for not wanting to reintroduce smelt ,

taxid

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Re: Brown
« Reply #9 on: Mar 25, 2018, 05:52 PM »
What is the reasoning for not wanting to reintroduce smelt ,

"Exotic species." Never mind the trout that are planted are technically exotic as they are not native. It's also claimed they eat the eggs of the native fish. Since when do smelt occupy the same water column as spawning largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, and bluegills? The water temps those species spawn in are too warm for smelt.

Only native species I would think the smelt could be in the same water as the eggs are northern pike and yellow perch. Yellow perch eggs aren't eaten by fish as the gelatinous eggs strands are naturally repulsive to fish, and the northern pike in the lake system are rare as spawning habitat is limited. Additionally the INDNR itself claims the habitat is best suited for coldwater fish and bluegill and bass fishing is minor. The lakes in this particular chain are quite infertile due to a marl bottom and fast drop offs.

If the smelt emigrated into downstream lakes they wouldn't survive the summer as the water quality isn't good enough for their survival in deep water. One of the lakes downstream used to holdover trout but it can no longer do so.

In past surveys when the smelt were common they showed no effect on the cisco (which are also gone) and they were found in the stomachs of all the gamefish predator species in the lake chain.

I suspect due to the refusal to allow the planting of smelt fry (from a private disease free source and fully funded privately) at some point someone will introduce gizzard shad, alewives, or smelt on their own. It's just a matter of time if someone feels the state does't give a crap to develop a fisheries to it's potential. People already illegal plant other species all over lake musky and walleye. That's how the smelt got their in the first place years ago on two different occasions. I just hope they don't bring in some pathogen or hitchhiking aquatic weed in the process.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

filetandrelease

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Re: Brown
« Reply #10 on: Mar 25, 2018, 06:14 PM »

Thank you , Lake Ontario produces large trout and salmon as we all know , stocking has been lowered of steelhead and lakers for a time do to the the lowered numbers of forage , smelt and alewives, but near shore fish such as bass , pike even perch and eyes are feasting on gobies these days

taxid

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Re: Brown
« Reply #11 on: Mar 25, 2018, 06:17 PM »
Wouldn't surprise me if gobies ended up in the chain some day. Zebra mussels are already here.

One saving grace with gobies might be they need rocky habitat don't they? The lake chain I referred to has no rocky habitat.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

taxid

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Re: Brown
« Reply #12 on: Mar 25, 2018, 06:21 PM »
Thank you , Lake Ontario produces large trout and salmon as we all know , stocking has been lowered of steelhead and lakers for a time do to the the lowered numbers of forage , smelt and alewives, but near shore fish such as bass , pike even perch and eyes are feasting on gobies these days

Doing some research on smelt in the northeast I found the species has down cycles. But as far as the Great Lakes who the heck knows as the food chain keeps changing? I think were are up to 183 invasive species and counting with 25 invasive fish species. They keep coming in on ballast water with nothing being done but talking about it last I heard.

VHS (Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia) probably came in on ballast water. I wonder what's next?

The feds did require testing for VHS for us fish farmers. Never mind the pathogen has never been found on a fish farm and probably never will.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

filetandrelease

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Re: Brown
« Reply #13 on: Mar 25, 2018, 06:26 PM »

In Oneida the perch are already feeding on small gobies , far as walleye I and a few others believe eyes will be a learned thing , I know not of bass and pickerel , I can only assume they will take advantage of an easy meal

fishogger

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Re: Brown
« Reply #14 on: Mar 26, 2018, 06:59 PM »
very nice slayerfish very nice!  beautiful fish.

 



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