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Author Topic: This looks pleasant  (Read 1145 times)

Turnbuckle

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This looks pleasant
« on: Aug 07, 2018, 03:40 PM »
JDK don’t go swimming tonight!


At the mouth of the river at Sebago in the Spring, it's East to West unless you want a beating from the rest! ;D ;D

JDK

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #1 on: Aug 07, 2018, 03:48 PM »
I know they got whacked today with some storms.  Just in time for the muskie derby.

# SAND

MarkNFish

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #2 on: Aug 08, 2018, 06:56 AM »
Hopefully it flushes (pun intended) before the derby.


teampar

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #3 on: Aug 08, 2018, 11:50 AM »
Hopefully it flushes (pun intended) before the derby.

It seems like they should have a better "back up" plan then dumping it untreated into the river in cases such as this? Is this the norm for most communities waste? I wonder if this was a resident who lives along the river and  was having sewer issues could they just dump it into the river and  say we will get it fixed as soon as we can. I bet they would get hung from the tallest tree.

taxid

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #4 on: Aug 08, 2018, 11:52 AM »
It's the state government they probably get a pass.  ::). Individuals or a corporation they will probably throw the book at you.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

jacksmelt

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #5 on: Aug 08, 2018, 08:15 PM »
It seems like they should have a better "back up" plan then dumping it untreated into the river in cases such as this? Is this the norm for most communities waste? I wonder if this was a resident who lives along the river and  was having sewer issues could they just dump it into the river and  say we will get it fixed as soon as we can. I bet they would get hung from the tallest tree.
it happens more often than they tell you! esp..in spring , when there is too much water w/ the waste coming into the plant to treat, they divert it , untreated into the watersheds. had a friend that worked in st. agathas sewer treatment plant that told me this. surprised more people dont get sick! canada does it regularly on the st. john. can smell a pipe dumping in a mile before you see it! i cringe when i see kids swimming in the st. john.
PARADISE IS A 5LB. SALMON ON A 5WT. FLYROD!!

taxid

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #6 on: Aug 08, 2018, 10:41 PM »
it happens more often than they tell you! esp..in spring , when there is too much water w/ the waste coming into the plant to treat, they divert it , untreated into the watersheds. had a friend that worked in st. agathas sewer treatment plant that told me this. surprised more people dont get sick! canada does it regularly on the st. john. can smell a pipe dumping in a mile before you see it! i cringe when i see kids swimming in the st. john.

Sadly not uncommon all over the country. Other priorities for money.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

stguy

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #7 on: Aug 09, 2018, 05:04 AM »
Most people don't realize that when the country was built that sewer and storm drains where one and the same and it was all gravity fed to the lowest point which is always a body of water. It's very expensive to separate the two now but the state of Maine has been trying for the last 30 or 40 years. Most of the road construction you see with the big excavators digging deep is just what they are doing.

JDK

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #8 on: Aug 09, 2018, 06:38 AM »
Truth of the matter is I am far more pizzed off over the amount of crap the agricultural community dumps into our streams, rivers, and lakes each and every year (each and every t-storm if we are being honest) than I am an isolated instance of a sewage treatment plant malfunction
# SAND

MarkNFish

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #9 on: Aug 09, 2018, 06:53 AM »
Truth of the matter is I am far more pizzed off over the amount of crap the agricultural community dumps into our streams, rivers, and lakes each and every year (each and every t-storm for that matter) than I am an isolated instance of a sewage treatment plant malfunction
Ditto on that.  I actually took photos of what I saw this morning on the way to work.  The tough part with the treatment plants is that everybody wants them to perform flawlessly, but nobody wants to pay higher rates. 

teampar

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #10 on: Aug 09, 2018, 07:29 AM »
Ditto on that.  I actually took photos of what I saw this morning on the way to work.  The tough part with the treatment plants is that everybody wants them to perform flawlessly, but nobody wants to pay higher rates.

I totally agree and understand everything is about money, the thing that bothers me is all involved that they have interviewed on the news are so ho hum about it.  I would be willing to bet that if it was a private citizen the attitude would have a little more urgency in it.

JDK

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #11 on: Aug 09, 2018, 10:07 AM »
I totally agree and understand everything is about money, the thing that bothers me is all involved that they have interviewed on the news are so ho hum about it.  I would be willing to bet that if it was a private citizen the attitude would have a little more urgency in it.

In my experience, municipalities and homeowners who work with the regulatory agency get a far different response than those that don't.  Most homeowners don't work to fix a faulty septic system that impacts water quality until they get caught.  Actually it is usually the neighbor that reports them.

# SAND

woodchip1

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #12 on: Aug 09, 2018, 10:48 AM »
This is a process that needs a lot more attention.
“The way we handle urine is we flush it down the toilet,” says the assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan. “We [flush urine] with water that’s been treated to a drinking water standard. And we flush a lot of water. We flush several times a day — gallons of water every time. Most of those [gallons] are for flushing urine down, and so especially in places like California where all of that water is so precious, it really doesn’t make sense to be flushing so much down the drain."
Besides the fact that flushing urine wastes water, scientists also say that urine contains valuable nutrients.

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“Urine contains a lot of nitrogen and phosphorus and potassium. In fact, if you look at what we excrete, more than half of the nitrogen and phosphorus and potassium excrete comes out in our urine, and that tends to be what we add to plants to fertilize them. So we’re interested in capturing those nutrients and turning it into a fertilizer product, rather than, ‘I’m sending it to the wastewater treatment plant where it’s treated in different ways,’” Wigginton says.
She and a group of researchers have been collecting urine to reuse as fertilizer on a community-wide scale in Brattleboro, Vermont. Before they can use the collected human waste in gardens, however, they have to put the liquid through a strenuous treatment process.
“There’s things in urine that we probably don’t want to be applying directly to plants and to the soil. Urine can contain pathogens and it can contain pharmaceuticals, so we’re looking at how to remove those and turn it into a safe and practical fertilizer,” Wigginton says.
Wigginton and her fellow researchers focus on two main things when they treat urine: condensing their product, and ridding it of harmful pharmaceuticals and organisms.
“It’s not very practical to truck large volumes of urine around, so it’s better to concentrate the nutrients down to smaller volumes or even as precipitates. So concentrating it, that makes it cheaper and easier to move around,” Wigginton says, adding, “And then the other thing is we need to get rid of the pharmaceuticals and organisms that are in it. … There’s lots of different ways you can treat it. But it’s all about concentrating and getting rid of some of the constituents.”
The Rich Earth Institute has been collaborating with the EPA, the Water Environment Research Foundation, University of Buffalo, Hampton Road Sanitation district in Virginia and others on the “Peecycling” project. They hope their research will help the EPA come up with guidelines and policies on what should be done with urine before it’s applied to plants and soils.
Wigginton and her colleagues have made progress in turning urine into a safe fertilizer. The results of their work are currently being used to fertilize experimental crops of carrots and lettuce. The biggest obstacle they face, however, is coming up with ideas on how to change the infrastructure in the US to accommodate new ways of treating and reusing human waste.
“The number one thing that’s holding it up right now is infrastructure. I mean we have a great sanitation system in the United States. But there’s definitely some inefficiencies,” Wigginton says.
Still, she thinks the project will gain ground quickly.
“I definitely expect in the next 10-20 years people are going to hear more about this,” Wigginton says, adding, “And we’re already seeing some buildings. Our partners at HRSD in Virginia, they’ve taken their headquarters and put in source-separating toilets and they’re collecting [urine] in a tank outside for their research.”
Wigginton has been turning her work into recommendations for the EPA, but she stops short of advising people to use urine they’ve collected themselves in their own gardens.
“I don’t think I’m in a position to tell people what to do at the household level. but it’s being done and there are lots of websites out there where people can get help on what they should do before they apply it to their yards,” she says.

jacksmelt

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #13 on: Aug 09, 2018, 07:46 PM »
urine comes out sterile if the person is healthy. its been used as a fertilizer, mixed with wood ashes for thousands of years. I've been collecting mine for years now and dumping on my compost pile. helps it break down faster and ads moisture to the compost. ;) many places in europe and asia have separate toilets so they can collect and use the urine. human urine is very rich in NPK. so much so that if its not diluted it will burn or kill plants.
PARADISE IS A 5LB. SALMON ON A 5WT. FLYROD!!

teampar

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Re: This looks pleasant
« Reply #14 on: Aug 10, 2018, 02:44 AM »
urine comes out sterile if the person is healthy. its been used as a fertilizer, mixed with wood ashes for thousands of years. I've been collecting mine for years now and dumping on my compost pile. helps it break down faster and ads moisture to the compost. ;) many places in europe and asia have separate toilets so they can collect and use the urine. human urine is very rich in NPK. so much so that if its not diluted it will burn or kill plants.

Remind me not to eat anything from your garden.😂

 



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