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Author Topic: Regional problem or with the “sport”?  (Read 616 times)

seamonkey84

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Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« on: Aug 11, 2019, 12:11 PM »
https://www.centralmaine.com/2019/08/11/why-catch-and-release-is-killing-maine-fisheries/

Many places in the country have seen shifts in the average size of the fish we are after. Bass that are almost always caught and released get over populated and the average size goes down. Some fish get preference for the table while others are valuable sport fish (toys) that we need to share and everyone needs to try and not break them.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

taxid

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #1 on: Aug 11, 2019, 10:50 PM »
Used to be years ago a common problem in farm ponds out here was stunted bluegills due to over harvest of bass. Now it's just the opposite with bass heavy ponds and smaller bass due to all the catch and release. I also believe bass get harder to catch with catch and release. I've observed bass in one of my ponds learning to avoid certain baits they get caught on a couple of times. With tournaments every weekend on some of our local lakes it makes one wonder.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

seamonkey84

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #2 on: Aug 11, 2019, 11:03 PM »
There’s a local pond that gets lots of pressure, especially during ice fishing since it gets stocked as a put and take during the fall. There are big bass that have switched to feeding only at night or on non “bait fish” feeds. They aren’t caught using live minnows under bobbers or fish traps, but I’ve watched them going after sunfish, While ignoring schools of shiners/minnows. The bass that are caught are all smallish and skinny. The big ones are the ones that got big enough to eat sunfish and the stocked trout. Oddly, the occasional yellow perch that is caught out of there are all bigger than the average in other places.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

fishogger

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #3 on: Aug 12, 2019, 10:54 AM »
I think they can get conditioned to say rattle baits easier than say soft lifelike baits.  that's why im a big fan of plastics. 
some fishermen tell lies,  this one doesnt need to

Fishermantim

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #4 on: Aug 19, 2019, 03:45 PM »
Of course the bigger fish will become wary of certain baits, particularly ones that they were caught on previously.
Similar thing has been noted with trout, that will avoid certain color lures because of prior "C&R".

That's why it always pays to have a variety of lures in your arsenal, so that you can switch to something they haven't seen much of, or before.
If you see a fish follow your lure but turn away without a strike, that fish may have probably had a negative experience with that shape or color lure/bait before. Not exactly scientific, but certainly possible given that many big "C&R" fish will see many different presentations during their lifespan....
"God is playing to an audience that's afraid to laugh" (George Burns from "Oh, GOD")

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!" - The Existential Blues

seamonkey84

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #5 on: Aug 21, 2019, 11:23 PM »
Oh I’ve seen the reaction of a landlocked salmon to a streamer fly I drifted towards it. He shot right up to my fly like it was going to bite, but then went past it and started shaking, digging and jumping like it just got hooked and was fighting on the line. Like flashbacks from what happens last time.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

taxid

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #6 on: Aug 26, 2019, 01:14 PM »
Oh I’ve seen the reaction of a landlocked salmon to a streamer fly I drifted towards it. He shot right up to my fly like it was going to bite, but then went past it and started shaking, digging and jumping like it just got hooked and was fighting on the line. Like flashbacks from what happens last time.

Fish get PTSD?! Who knew?!
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

seamonkey84

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #7 on: Aug 26, 2019, 03:33 PM »
I can’t find the video right now, but there was an interview with a biologist that described the same reaction. He was fishing the same spot several times, and knew it was the same school of trout as there were a few he recognized catching a few times using the same fly. Then as time went on, fish stoped biting, but several of them would have a visceral reaction after seeing the fly. Jumping, shaking and digging just like it had been hooked.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

fishogger

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Re: Regional problem or with the “sport”?
« Reply #8 on: Sep 01, 2019, 07:48 AM »
lmao that is wild!


some fishermen tell lies,  this one doesnt need to

 



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