FishUSA.com Fishing Tackle The Fishing Tackle Superstore

Author Topic: Trolling for Salmon  (Read 1104 times)

Rlace19

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4
Trolling for Salmon
« on: Mar 25, 2020, 02:22 PM »
Any tips? Usually troll a Rapala out of my kayak about 5ft down. Did not have any luck last year. Looking for lure suggestions. Should I focus on shorelines or not restrict myself?

Steve H.

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 139
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #1 on: Mar 25, 2020, 03:19 PM »
Where are you fishing?  Are you getting out at first light?  I've caught lots of salmon on stickbaits 5 feet down, so that's not the problem.  Shorelines are great in the early spring as the smelt tend to hug the shorelines.  Focus around points and any inlets, as even the smallest streams can sometimes attract smelt to congregate.  Also, try spoons such as Mooselook Wobblers, DB Smelt, etc.  With trolling spoons, may need to put a splitshot or two on your line if you're not using a sinking fly line or leadcore.
It is understood that fishing licenses, gas, bait, etc., all cost money, but try not to let a limit of trout be your only gauge for success. Ė Ben Nugent, (NH F&G) Regional Fisheries Biologist

Rlace19

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #2 on: Mar 25, 2020, 06:06 PM »
I fished Merrymeeting last year a lot. Not a single nibble. I want to try other places this year. Also get out at first light every time I go

Steve H.

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 139
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #3 on: Mar 26, 2020, 11:44 AM »
I've never fished Merrymeeting and don't know much about it, other than I heard it can be very slow for trout and salmon.

For action, I think it would be hard to beat Winnipesaukee.  If only because the state stocks 30,000 salmon (and 15,000 rainbows) in it every year.  Yes, it can be a bit of a zoo early season, but trolling Alton Bay at first light between ice out and mid May would be a solid bet to hook up.  Stickbaits work, but I've done better with spoons or live smelt if you can get them.  A sinking or sink tip fly line, if you have one, can increase your chances too, over flatlining straight mono.  Especially with spoons.
It is understood that fishing licenses, gas, bait, etc., all cost money, but try not to let a limit of trout be your only gauge for success. Ė Ben Nugent, (NH F&G) Regional Fisheries Biologist

AquaAssassin

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,714
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #4 on: Mar 26, 2020, 04:17 PM »
Yes nothing beats winni for action or ever will. Quality can be had many other places but prepare for a few landed a couple LDRís and thatís a good day  ;D

USUALLY, early season you could have a banger though
Itís not being Cocky if you can back it up.

skinnywater

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 73
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #5 on: Mar 26, 2020, 07:52 PM »
Run at least 50ft of Fluoro to your mono, lead or fly line while trolling. 
greenshack on shanty

seamonkey84

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,068
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #6 on: Mar 26, 2020, 11:44 PM »
Run at least 50ft of Fluoro to your mono, lead or fly line while trolling.
Thatís a lot of leader... I have no problem with just 12-18í using lead core or fly line. The lead core and fly line follow the path the boat takes, the leader line doesnít, so any turns or zig zags you make would be a lot less effective on putting a different action to your presentation.
To the OP, do you have any sort of sonar/gps map? Are you using a Rapala that is said to dive 5ft or using some sort of sinking line? Speed control important when it comes to trolling and your lure choice. Are you paddling or do you have a peddle drive system? That can impart different actions to different lures. The rapala stick baits should work fine, just stick with the smallish ones and test the action next to you as you paddle to see what speed you should be going. Other thing is, when the water is colder, before it hits 55F, they may not be as aggressive and want a slower presentation, which live bait or plastic (gulp minnow is my go to) might work better, or even inline spinners like a Mepps with wider blades that work at slower speeds.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

skinnywater

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 73
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #7 on: Mar 27, 2020, 08:36 AM »
Thatís a lot of leader... I have no problem with just 12-18í using lead core or fly line. The lead core and fly line follow the path the boat takes, the leader line doesnít, so any turns or zig zags you make would be a lot less effective on putting a different action to your presentation.
To the OP, do you have any sort of sonar/gps map? Are you using a Rapala that is said to dive 5ft or using some sort of sinking line? Speed control important when it comes to trolling and your lure choice. Are you paddling or do you have a peddle drive system? That can impart different actions to different lures. The rapala stick baits should work fine, just stick with the smallish ones and test the action next to you as you paddle to see what speed you should be going. Other thing is, when the water is colder, before it hits 55F, they may not be as aggressive and want a slower presentation, which live bait or plastic (gulp minnow is my go to) might work better, or even inline spinners like a Mepps with wider blades that work at slower speeds.

I know that is what I used to do.  I have been keeping a log and that is one thing that increased hook up rate.
 Hook up rate goes way up in clear water.  I use 100 ft when fishing Ontario.  Give it a shot run one rod next to the others and see what happens.  I have had zero problems.
greenshack on shanty

mowbizz

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 71
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #8 on: Mar 27, 2020, 11:50 AM »
Regarding the long leader, if you have a reel set up done by AJís, he automatically puts on 50-60í of leader...canít argue with the pros.
Only trouble I have had trolling was using 3 rods with lead core (no down riggers. I had a couple of tangles then removed the middle rod and stuck it out with 2.

seamonkey84

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,068
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #9 on: Mar 27, 2020, 12:32 PM »
I know that is what I used to do.  I have been keeping a log and that is one thing that increased hook up rate.
 Hook up rate goes way up in clear water.  I use 100 ft when fishing Ontario.  Give it a shot run one rod next to the others and see what happens.  I have had zero problems.
I guess Iíll try it with 50 or more feet of leader then... but I use a fly reel so thatís a lot of extra reeling lol.
"You know when they have a fishing show on TV? They catch the fish and then let it go. They don't want to eat the fish, they just want to make it late for something." - Mitch Hedberg

mowbizz

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 71
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #10 on: Mar 27, 2020, 04:36 PM »
I guess Iíll try it with 50 or more feet of leader then... but I use a fly reel so thatís a lot of extra reeling lol.
Later in the season itís a lot of reeling with lead core too! More than 300í out there sometimes

Rlace19

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 4
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #11 on: Mar 27, 2020, 04:57 PM »
Based on the replies I think I am using too little leader. Iím used to bass fishing and if I put any leader on itís only 3-5 feet! So thatís the first thing Iíll change up when the big lakes are fishable. And as for my kayak it is a peddle drive Hobie and has a Lowrance depth finder on it so I can manage my speed easily. What speed do you guys recommend for salmon/lakers?

zwiggles

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,133
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #12 on: Mar 27, 2020, 07:56 PM »
Slow early In the season, and faster later in general. But vary it up until you find what they like, and donít be afraid to bang circles, figure 8s until you find out what they like.

burgerunh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 246
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #13 on: Mar 30, 2020, 10:27 AM »
I typically troll for salmon between 1.8 and 2.2 mph with spoons. 

If using live bait slower is better.  0.5-1.2 mph

fishsluggos

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 255
Re: Trolling for Salmon
« Reply #14 on: Mar 30, 2020, 02:01 PM »
I typically troll for salmon between 1.8 and 2.2 mph with spoons. 

If using live bait slower is better.  0.5-1.2 mph

X2

flies 3 to as high as 5 MPH.

 



Iceshanty | MyFishFinder | MyHuntingForum
Contact | Disclaimer | Sponsor
© 2004- MyFishFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.