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Author Topic: Minnow bait  (Read 671 times)

scooper47

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Minnow bait
« on: Jun 19, 2021, 07:20 AM »
I was hoping someone could help me with advice to catch some minnows. I need them for the small fish pond in my back yard. If I don't put a few fish in, it will fill up with mosquito larvae. I like dace (not fallfish) about 1" to 2", but I haven't gotten enough into my trap. I've always had success in the past, but this year is different.

I don't need a spot; I need bait. What do you use? I've seen many mentions of dog food; is that wet or dry? Why wouldn't cat food, say in a fish flavor, be better? And what's the minimum amount of time I have to leave it in?

Thanks in advance.

SalmonAndStriper Stalker

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #1 on: Jun 19, 2021, 07:33 AM »
dry dog or cat food and bread is my bait of choice. I tend to use dog food more as it's a larger tidbit that won't fit fall through the mesh of the trap.

taxid

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #2 on: Jun 19, 2021, 09:41 AM »
Fathead minnows from the bait store aka crappie minnows will work just fine for mosquito larvae control.
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ICEHOLE

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #3 on: Jun 20, 2021, 01:57 AM »
I mean if you wanna have fun doing it, rig up a small hali sukkula on a slip bobber. Grab some.fresh white bread and make little dough balls about half the size of a tic rack. I've harvested over 5 dozen shiners and a couple hours this way..
Make sure it's a calm flat day for seeing strikes on the float
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Fishermantim

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #4 on: Jun 22, 2021, 04:59 PM »
If you are just looking for fish to each the bug larvae, you could go with sunfish too.
They're easy to catch, do a good job on any insects that fall in/on the water, and if you allow them to stay and breed for next year, you'll have free bait.

The only issue is the legal transport/transplant of live fish.
There might be a loophole in regards to "bait" status, but I'd check first.

There's always the "goldfish" option. They are good for the bug eating task as well.

In any case, you will have a number of options to consider.
"God is playing to an audience that's afraid to laugh" (George Burns from "Oh, GOD")

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scooper47

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #5 on: Jun 23, 2021, 06:17 AM »
If you are just looking for fish to each the bug larvae, you could go with sunfish too.
They're easy to catch, do a good job on any insects that fall in/on the water, and if you allow them to stay and breed for next year, you'll have free bait.

The only issue is the legal transport/transplant of live fish.
There might be a loophole in regards to "bait" status, but I'd check first.

There's always the "goldfish" option. They are good for the bug eating task as well.

In any case, you will have a number of options to consider.

Thanks for your suggestions. At 125 gallons, my fish pond is way too small for sunfish. They would panic constantly. I've had a few larger dace in the past, and they do too. Goldfish present a problem because my pond freezes solid every winter; it's only about 14" deep. I would either have to keep them alive in my house (too much trouble) or kill them. It is illegal to let them go in the wild. I return the dace to the place where I caught them.

You are right about transporting live fish. They have to be among the eight legal bait fish listed in the abstracts.

taxid

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #6 on: Jun 23, 2021, 08:40 AM »
Fatheads (Pimephales promelas) are extremely hardy in winter. In fact in Minnesota they are harvested from shallow ponds that regularly winter kill any other fish species that get into them hence why they are ideal for bait minnow production.



 
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SalmonAndStriper Stalker

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #7 on: Jun 23, 2021, 09:28 PM »
I 2nd the fathead opinion. you can get them cheap at petco too. I believe rosy reds are a type of fatheads as well.

scooper47

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #8 on: Jun 24, 2021, 06:33 AM »
Fatheads (Pimephales promelas) are extremely hardy in winter. In fact in Minnesota they are harvested from shallow ponds that regularly winter kill any other fish species that get into them hence why they are ideal for bait minnow production.



Are you saying that fatheads would survive being frozen solid for months?

SalmonAndStriper Stalker

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #9 on: Jun 24, 2021, 10:40 AM »
Are you saying that fatheads would survive being frozen solid for months?
most likely not but cheap to add and replace.

Fishermantim

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #10 on: Jun 24, 2021, 03:11 PM »
If you have an aerator to keep the O2 levels up, it will also prevent the pond from freezing over completely (except in really bad winters).

If this is only a seasonal pond, then the minnows would be your best bet, since goldfish do require some care during the winter.

My brother had koi in a pond, and the ones that the heron didn't get were put in an old cooler with an aerator, and left in his garage.
When the water temps get really cold, many fish don't require much/any food if they don't have to expend any energy.
Feeding pond fish during the winter can cause the food to spoil because the fish may not eat it all, and if they do, their waste will cause an ammonia spike requiring filtration or water changing.

Keep it simple and you really can't go wrong--->minnows.
"God is playing to an audience that's afraid to laugh" (George Burns from "Oh, GOD")

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!" - The Existential Blues

taxid

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #11 on: Jun 24, 2021, 05:28 PM »
Are you saying that fatheads would survive being frozen solid for months?

Not frozen solid but they can survive ice and snow cover along with low D.O. better than any other species.
“The trouble with quotes on the Internet is you never know if they are genuine.” —Abraham Lincoln

fishinator

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #12 on: Jun 24, 2021, 06:21 PM »
If it's an ornamental garden pond why not add some type of flow like a waterfall?  If there isn't power available for a pump they make floating solar fountains. Any surface disturbance will stop the skeeters  from breeding.

scooper47

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Re: Minnow bait
« Reply #13 on: Jun 25, 2021, 06:46 AM »
If it's an ornamental garden pond why not add some type of flow like a waterfall?  If there isn't power available for a pump they make floating solar fountains. Any surface disturbance will stop the skeeters  from breeding.

Thanks. I didn't know that. I do have a pump, and it returns the water directly over the pond. I wrap the intake in cloth to act as a filter since the pond gets direct sunlight for a few hours every day.

 



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